Pineapple Not-So-Fried Rice

Ingredients

14ounces non-gmo extra-firm tofu, drained

2tablespoons gluten free soy sauce, I use Tamari

1– pineapple, or 11⁄2 cups diced pineapple

1tablespoon coconut oil

— onion, thinly sliced

— Pink Himalayan Sea salt

3– cloves garlic, minced

2teaspoons curry powder

1teaspoon ground coriander

1teaspoon chili-garlic sauce

3/4cup cashews

— carrot, peeled and shredded

1/2cup frozen peas

1/2cup raisins

3/4cup cooked rice, preferably brown basmati or quinoa

1/4cup vegetable broth

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Grease a small baking sheet.

Press the tofu to get out as much water as possible. After pressing, cut the tofu into 1⁄2-inch cubes. In a bowl, toss tofu with Tamari sauce until each cube is coated. Place in one layer on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 35 minutes, turning the tofu a couple of times with a spatula. Remove from oven and set aside.

To prepare pineapple, cut in half lengthwise using a sharp knife. Remove the flesh and cut into bite-sized pieces. Set aside 11⁄2 cups for this recipe, and save the rest for another use (see here for other uses) Reserve the shell for serving.

In a large skillet or wok, heat oil over medium-high heat and sauté onions until soft and lightly browned. Season with pink salt. Add garlic, curry, coriander, and chili-garlic sauce, and let cook a few more minutes. Add cashews, carrots, peas, raisins, rice, broth, pineapple, and tofu. Cook until heated through and adjust salt to taste. Serve the rice or quinoa like they do in Thai- land—in the pineapple shell!

Raw Joy, Jackie

Crocktober means FALL!!

Hey!!! The air is crisp, the leaves are changing, the days are shorter, and the nights are cool. It’s the perfect time for a hardy, but healthy, meal. What’s not to love about our crockpots?

Eating clean doesn’t have to be boring or challenging!

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Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil.
  • 1 large white onion sliced.
  • 2 (15 ounce) cans cannellini beans (dont’t drain)
  • 1 can butter beans (don’t drain)
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups kale, torn into 1” pieces. Leave stems on, packed full of nutrients in those trunks.
  • Pink Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons Herbs de Provence Seasonings
  • 2 tablespoons Italian Seasonings

Directions

Just dump it all in and add the seasonings to the top, stir to mix the flavors. Cook on high for 2-3 hours then serve and enjoy.

For more where these came from, subscribe and you’ll be added to the FB event page where you will find a plethora of Fall goodness.

InRAWJoy, Jackie

Spotlight Saturday, in the kitchen

Spiral vegetable slicer

Zucchini noodles prepared using a spiral slicer

Spiral vegetable slicers (also known as spiralizers) are kitchen appliances used for cutting vegetables, such as zucchinis, potatoes, cucumbers, carrots, apples, and beetroots, into linguine-like strands which can be used as an alternative to pasta.


 Spiralizers usually contain three blades: a round blade for spaghetti, a small flat blade for ribbons, and a large wide blade for spiral strands. Vegetables are clamped between the blade and crank. As the handle turns with a bit of pressure, the vegetable is pressed between the turning handle and the blade, which cuts it into spirals.

Spiralizers are often used to produce vegan or vegetarian meals or to transform high calorie meals into healthier options. Recipes containing spiraled ingredients are available on health blogs, (particularly vegan, vegetarian and paleo) and on social media sites or like this Tangled Thai Salad here.

I have to admit, not only am I learning to love easy, simple and quick creations but I’m also really loving being in the kitchen! And that’s HUGE!

So go spin a veggie, Jackie

P.s. I’d love to hear what you create.

New Study: “Moderation” is Ineffective for Weight Loss

One of the most misused and least understood messages when it comes to weight loss is “eat in moderation”. A recent study concludes that moderation is not effective in helping people lose weight.

To kick off, there is no standard definition of moderation as it pertains to food consumption. Moderation is a relative term, and as such, it does not provide a clear, objective method to measure calorie intake. Are 10 potato chips a moderate serving? Or should that be 7? Maybe 15? Ask 3 different people and you’ll get 4 answers.

 

The relative meaning of the word moderation is based on people’s individual perceptions. In the study, a group of overweight individuals was asked what a moderate amount of cookies is. Their answers were all over the place.


People are not good judges of what a moderate amount is, and thus, conclude the researchers, should be given more precise instructions.
What do you think about the term “moderation”?

Source: vanDellen et al – How do people define moderation? – Appetite, June 2016

Eat Fruits and Vegetables, Be Happy?

New Study Links Fruit and Vegetable Consumption With Happiness

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There’s a certain jolt of joy I get from biting into a perfectly ripe peach from my local farmers’ market or slicing into a luscious vine-ripened tomato from my garden. I always thought this was a temporary high — one that disappeared as soon as the juice was dried from my sticky fingers. But according to a new study, how many fruits and vegetables we eat daily may measurably impact how happy we feel.

Researchers from New Zealand recently published a study in the British Journal of Health Psychology which observes a link between eating more fruit and vegetables and feeling happier and more engaged in life.
The study followed 405 university students for a 13-day period during which they kept food diaries and filled out questionnaires designed to measure creativity, curiosity, and other aspects of psychological health. Subjects rated statements such as “Today I was engaged and interested in my daily activities” on a seven-point scale from “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree.”

The results? People who ate more fruits and vegetables reported higher levels of curiosity, creativity, and other positive emotions. They also felt more engagement, meaning, and purpose in their lives. “These findings suggest that fruit and vegetable intake is related to other aspects of human flourishing, beyond just feeling happy,” explains University of Otago psychologist Tamlin Conner.

Importantly, the results were not only applicable across people, but also across time. In other words, on days when participants ate more fruits and vegetables, they felt better than on the days when they skimped. That’s some pretty immediate feedback from the body!

While it’s possible that feeling more positive causes people to eat better rather than the other way around, researchers suggest the micronutrients in produce, particularly vitamin C, might be at work. Vitamin C helps the body make dopamine, a neurotransmitter that plays a role in motivation and engagement. Another factor could be that eating fruits and vegetables helps reduce inflammation, which may improve mood.

This is just another reason why growing your own produce makes sense. When it’s steps from your door, there’s no reason not to include healthy food in all your meals. I know from experience that gardening isn’t always easy, but there is something that can make it easier. Tower Garden!
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Tower Garden is a highly efficient aeroponic growing system that allows you to grow a lot of produce in a little space. It has quite a few advantages over traditional gardening. First, it grows produce in about half the time of soil-based agriculture. Second, it uses just a fraction of the water and soil, so it’s an ecological alternative.

Third, its compact design fits in just about any sunny spot outdoors (think patios, rooftops, terraces, balconies, decks, or porches), and assembly is easy. Fourth, there’s no weeding, tilling, kneeling, or getting dirty. Fifth, because it’s designed to last a lifetime, Tower Garden is actually a better long-term value than store-bought produce. And with this new research, who knows? It could even make you and your loved ones happier.

Have you ever thought about the relationship between your diet and your mood? Have you noticed a happiness lift from eating more fruits and vegetables? Share your experiences in the comments below.

So you’ve decided to go raw; now what?

You would think that doing all the studying about eating healthy, getting inspired and finally making this momentous decision would be good enough!

But raw food doesn’t grow on trees….I mean…it does, actually…but it isn’t exactly readily available everywhere you go like, say, junk food is.

I think if you are going to be successful at eating raw, you need a plan. It’s not just about what you aren’t going to eat, but you need to know what you are going to eat.

Even if it’s just planning a smoothie for breakfast, salad for lunch, and nut-milk for dinner, that’s a start. You have to learn the best places in your area to buy the various ingredients you’ll need. You have to get in the habit of buying basic raw ingredients to create easy raw recipes on the fly.

But won’t you be hungry eating just salads and smoothies?

To know more, and to get a little detail let’s connect! Go on over to my CONTACT PAGE and I’d  be happy to guide you in this process.


To your health, Jackie